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Date: October 17th, 2005
Article by: Joe Anderson (Hardware Reviewer)

Edited by: Nathan Glentworth (Owner / Head Editor)
Product was submitted by: Zalman USA
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PRODUCT PICTORIAL AND WALKTHROUGH



The manual and mounting solutions get high marks as well. The manual is refreshingly well written and provides clear and detailed installation instructions in several languages. Zalman's solutions for the various socket configurations are elegant in their simplicity and installation is a breeze. If the Fatal1ty is being installed into an existing system, the motherboard will need to be removed from the case for all applications except the Intel socket 478. An installation movie is also available on the Zalman website.


Tweaknews Tip: The Fatal1ty FS-C77 greatly exceeds the specified maximum weight of 450g for Intel Socket 775/478 and AMD Socket 754/939/940 motherboards. One must be very cautious when moving a computer with this, or any other heavy cooler attached to the motherboard. To be on the safe side, the cooler should be removed when transporting the computer.



As expected, installation was a breeze thanks to the detailed manual and superior mounting solution. The fantail with its 3-pin connector is long enough to reach virtually anywhere on an ATX motherboard. A clearance problem reared its ugly head when the fan on my aftermarket Northbridge cooler interfered with the Zalman cooler. Removing the offending fan allowed installation to proceed without incident. During testing, the Fatal1ty cooler moved enough air over the Northbridge heatsink to keep temperatures well under control here and the ramsinks on the video card also benefited from the Fatal1ty's fan. I was prepared to have my ears assaulted by the noise this fan made and was pleasantly surprised to find the Fatal1ty fairly quiet. Don't get me wrong, you can hear it, but the sound it generates is nothing like the high-pitched whine of smaller fans at these speeds, and not much louder than the stock cooler. At any rate, the noise is easy to live with, given the performance, as we'll see shortly.

 

PRODUCT TESTING



I'm going to be installing this cooler on an Abit IC-7 motherboard fitted with my trusty old P4 2.8C processor (1.525 Vcore). I'll be comparing the cooling performance of the Fatal1ty against the stock Intel HSF and will be using Arctic Silver 5 thermal compound in both installations. Testing will take place in a Thermaltake Kandalf chassis with the side panels installed. Fans will run full speed throughout the testing process, and test parameters for both coolers are as follows:

•  Ambient temperature a consistent 25C.

•  Run Prime95, at maximum heat setting, for 2 hours to “burn-in” the thermal paste.

•  Shut down computer for one hour.

•  Boot computer and leave idling at no load for one hour. Record idle temperature.

•  Run Prime95, at torture test setting, for two hours. Record load temperature.


Just for grins, I kicked the Vcore up to 1.625 and overclocked the 2.8 to 3.4 GHz with the following results:


The results :



Not too bad! I'm very impressed with the performance of the Fatal1ty cooler. It's far superior to the stock cooler and will allow for some moderate overclocking as well.

 

 

 


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