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Date: January 22nd, 2007
Article by: Jackie Mueller (Hardware Reviewer)
Edited by: Nathan Glentworth (Owner / Head Editor)
Product was submitted by: Thermaltake USA
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PRODUCT PICTORIAL AND WALKTHROUGH



An 8-pin/4-pin auxiliary connector is included for additional power required by some motherboards.



A total of six SATA power connectors are included three on each cable. This should be plenty for most setups.



One floppy connector is on each of these cables, along with four molex connectors. Raised tabs on each molex connector provide better grip when plugging in or removing it.


That wraps up the walkthrough, so let's get this PSU installed and see how it performs.

 

PRODUCT INSTALLATION AND TESTING


Here's the system this PSU will be powering:


- Biostar TForce 550 SE Motherboard
- AMD X2 3600+ Brisbane CPU overclocked to 2.8 GHz
- Thermaltake Bigwater 760i LCS
- 2 x 1GB GSkill PC2-6400 RAM
- XFX Geforce 8600GT Video card
- 2 x 80GB WD800JD SATA hard drives
- NEC DVD-RW
- Thermaltake Toughpower 650W PSU



Installation is the same as any other PSU, and this particular one is not overly long or oddly shaped so it doesn't require a larger than usual space to fit in. I went ahead and installed the sound dampening cover too, in hopes of further minimizing any noise and vibration.


There's no question that a multimeter is the only way to get a truly accurate reading of voltages. Unfortunately I don't have one, so instead I will be using Speedfan software to take voltage readings along with real-world usage to provide the most accurate results possible. Voltages were first recorded after the system had been sitting idle at the Windows desktop for one hour, and then recorded again after two hours of continuous torture testing with Orthos Prime.


The +12V rails are especially crucial for overclocking purposes as that is what helps keep a system stable. I was concerned when that rail only read 11.90V both in Speedfan and in the BIOS, but it didn't seem to affect performance.


The results were as follows:

 

+3.3V

+5V

+12V

Idle

3.30

5.00

11.90

Load

3.25

4.97

11.90


During the time the system was at 100% load, the voltages didn't fluctuate very much. Despite these voltages being on the low side for a PSU with these specs, I had no issues to speak of. Playing several hours of Half-Life 2 and Team Fortress 2 resulted in no errors, lockups, or reboots. All in all, the Toughpower delivered and was quite capable of running a full computer with a water cooling system.


The fan was indeed very quiet. The speed is automatically controlled by the internal temperature, and while the system was under full load I could hear it just barely, and when it was idle I had to look and make sure it was running because I couldn't hear it.

 

 


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