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Article by: Joe Anderson (Hardware Reviewer)
Edited By: Nathan Glentworth (Owner / Head Editor)
Product was submitted by: Thermaltake
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PRODUCT INSTALLATION AND TESTING (cont'd)



For the first test, I used a Thermaltake Toughpower Grand 1200W power supply. After making all the connections and assuring the wall cord is attached to the PSU and the switch was in the “on” position, pressing the side button on the Dr. Power II illuminates the LCD screen (in blue) and displays icons for the attached connectors across the bottom. Pressing the button again (for less than 5 seconds) starts the power supply and activates testing in Mode A. Pressing and releasing the side button allows the user to toggle manually through the readings of the attached connectors starting with the 24-pin connector. Holding the button in for 5 seconds at the start puts the device in Mode B, which progresses through the connectors automatically, and displays the measured voltage for 5 seconds before moving on. If the device detects a problem, the screen will change to red and will sound a beep. Both modes operated as expected and no trouble was detected from the PSU.



Next, I dug out a troublesome power supply from my extensive stock of junk and plugged it into the Dr. Power II. It never got past the “24P” test, as the voltage was outside the parameters for +12V. The screen turned red and a persistent beep let me know that this PSU was a POS. At this point, Dr. Power II won't proceed and will shut down the PSU in a few seconds. A quick test with a multimeter revealed that the +12V rail was outputting only 10.8V, way out of spec! So far, so good for the Dr. Power II.



Another unit from the boneyard failed virtually every test it could and wouldn't even start. Now, let's go back to the known good PSU and check the accuracy of the readings.




Thermaltake lists the accuracy of the Dr. Power II as +/- 0.1V. The meter is listed as +/- 0.5% (0.06V at 12V.) As you can see, the readings are within the accuracy specification, and this is more accurate than the other products I've tried.



One small issue that may come up is that the fairly common EZ-Pinch Molex connector will block the SATA port. In this case, users may have to make two passes to get all the connectors tested. Aside from this, I found no other issues with the Dr. Power II device during a couple of days of use and testing.

 

 


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