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Date: December 15th, 2005
Article by: Matt Mantle (Hardware Reviewer)
Edited by: Nathan Glentworth (Owner / Head Editor)
Product was submitted by: Thermaltake
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PRODUCT COMPOSITION & WALKTHROUGH (cont'd)



Finally the guts of the case, just the way it looks after opening the packaging. Everything was secured tightly with twist-ties and ready for you computer installation. As you can see in the above photo, there is quite a bit of free space allowing the buyer to install their components without the limitation of cramped quarters.



Inside that white box are the basics - a standard I/O plate and all the necessary hardware to make the job go easily, even a few zip ties for some minor cable management.



As you can see from this photo, although it isn't a full tower case, there is room for everything. An interesting design note - you can see the leads from the front panel USB/Firewire/Sound hanging from the top. This is a bit of a departure from the regular, but personally I like that its higher up, as it makes the front connections easier to access if your computer is on the floor instead of the desk.



At the bottom right corner is the HDD rack. This rack doubles as the holder for the tool-less 5.25" drive rails. Right next to that is the front 120mm intake. Now, we've all run into trouble with a front intake...where's that airflow supposed to go to if its being blocked by the drive cage? Thermaltake has two solutions for you. The first is the easiest - the drive cage has LOTS of holes in it, enough to allow for a moderate airflow over your hot hard drives, should you have more than one. The second method...


 

 

 

 

 

 


...is just to take the drive cage right out. If you're running only one big HDD, or if you've got 5.25" silent adaptors for your HDD, then this is the option for you. Straight away you're opening the case up wide for airflow front to back, and your HDD is still going to catch the airflow from the fan in the front if you're using the 3.5" rack right above (technically its for a floppy...but like I said I don't use one).



Mid-tower cases are always a little tricky to get everything in, get it organized and get your airflow up. As you can see, though its tight in the Swing case, for a midtower...that's still a lot of space. With that lower drive cage removed there's easily enough room for a moderate water-cooling system, and even without, I've seen some of the lowest case temperatures I've ever had, and the quietest my computer has run with 2 silent 120mm fans running intake and exhaust. For a mid-tower case, I'm impressed.

 

 


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