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Date: April 3rd, 2008
Article by: Nathan Glentworth (Owner / Head Editor)
Product was submitted by: Crucial
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CRUCIAL BALLISTIX TRACER 2GIG PC2-8500 INTRODUCTION



When building your next computer, take this analogy seriously when purchasing your components. Your computer in theory is a chain of components that work together to get a task completed. When you skimp and go cheap on one of your components, you are essentially building a weak/defective link into a potentially dependable and fast computer.


One of those components which most novices will go cheap on is the memory. The usual excuse is that they can get more memory for the same price or they can put the money to better use by putting the extra money towards a slightly better videocard or processor. To some this will make complete sense but little do they know they just cut the dependability of their computer by a measurable percentage. You get what you pay will always haunt you.


On the bright side you do have good dependable and extremely popular options on the market especially if you are into building an enthusiast gaming computer built for home use and the odd lan party. The memory being reviewed today is made by one of, if not THE biggest memory manufacturers on the planet. But in addition to that, it is their premier Ballistix Tracer line which is not only supposed to perform, but look good as well.


Let's see if this kit lives up to its name.

 

CRUCIAL CORPORATE PROFILE



Crucial offers customers a number of clear advantages over our competitors. As the only consumer memory supplier that's part of a major DRAM manufacturer, we sell high-quality memory that has been qualified and approved by all major original equipment manufacturers. That's important to customers who need quality-assured memory for mission-critical applications.


A lot of memory companies claim to be memory manufacturers even though they're just memory module assemblers. By putting two pre-manufactured memory parts together to build a memory module, they feel they've manufactured memory. Truth is, there is only one company in America that actually manufactures the DRAM chips, the memory printed circuit board, and then assembles them into memory modules - Micron and its memory division, Crucial Technology.


Memory modules are made of two pieces - the DRAM semiconductor chips that store data and the printed circuit board (PCB) connecting the chips to the rest of the computer. There are only a handful of semiconductor manufacturers with the engineering expertise to make DRAM chips. They include Micron, Samsung, Hitachi, and Hyundai. Micron has over 2,000 engineers and a 1.8 million-square-foot manufacturing facility with state-of-the-art clean rooms, memory testers, and exacting quality control. Crucial memory is recognized worldwide for its power and performance. Our memory is used by Apple, Gateway, HP, IBM, Micron and more - for good reason. Crucial offers over 110,000 upgrades for more than 20,000 different computers, notebooks, servers and printers. And we guarantee that the high-quality memory you buy is 100% compatible with your system or your money back.

 

 


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