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Date: September 26th, 2008
Article by: Joe Anderson (Hardware Reviewer)
Edited by: Nathan Glentworth (Owner / Head Editor)
Product was submitted by: Arctic Cooling
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PRODUCT PICTORIAL AND WALKTHROUGH



As I mentioned before, the bottom three fins will channel airflow to the area immediately surrounding the socket to help cool mosfets and other components in this area. I'm anxious to see how the Freezer 7 Pro performs, so let's get it installed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PRODUCT INSTALLATION AND TESTING



Installation is very straightforward, and very similar to the OEM Intel heatsink. The included instruction sheet provides a detailed guide both for the removal of the OEM cooler and the installation of the Freezer 7. Just make sure the clips are oriented properly and remember to fasten diagonally opposite clips simultaneously. Attach the fan, plug it in, and you're good to go. If you're replacing an OEM HSF (or one with a similar mounting scheme,) this can be done without removing the motherboard from the case. Nice!



The Freezer comes a bit close to the large Northbridge heatsink on this board, but there were no other fitment issues.



For this review, I've chosen a DFI Infinity P965-S motherboard coupled with an Intel Core 2 Duo E4300 Allendale processor (overclocked to 2.4 GHz, +0.1 Vcore.) The other components are listed below.


- eVGA 7900GS KO graphics card with Arctic Cooling Accelero cooler
- Buffalo Firestix PC2-6400 (1024mb X 2) memory
- Zalman ZM600-HP heatpipe modular 600 Watt PSU
-Western Digital Raptor 740 SATA hard drive
- Samsung DVD-RW SATA drive


I've tested all the coolers in the comparison in the bare frame pictured above. This eliminates any effects that a case might introduce. Keep in mind that temps inside your case will be different, depending on the case and airflow. The fans you choose will also have an effect on cooling.


The following parameters were used throughout testing:


•  Arctic Silver 5 TIM used on all coolers.
•  Ambient temperature kept at a constant 20C.
•  Idle temperatures were recorded after one hour of zero load after booting to the desktop with Windows XP Pro.
•  Load temperatures were recorded after one hour of maximum CPU heat testing using OCCT
•  Core temperatures were logged with RealTemp (v. 2.70.)
•  Fan speeds were recorded using Smart Guardian.
•  Idle and load temperatures were recorded at stock CPU speed (1.8 Ghz. 1.328 Vcore) and at a 40% overclock (2.5 Ghz. 1.424 Vcore)
•  Fan speed set to maximum in BIOS to show best performance.


The computer was shut down for a minimum of one hour between tests. Here are the results.


Stock results:



Overclocked Results:



The data speaks for itself. The Arctic Cooling Freezer 7 Pro does a great job. Subjectively, it was also one of the quietest, although all these coolers were quite loud at these speeds. Tailoring the fan speeds via the PWM feature on most motherboards will yield lower decibels on the Freezer 7 Pro, but cooling performance will likely suffer.

 

 


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